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All you need to know about Caveats: A legal notice that can impact your Property ownership

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Sunstate explain Caveats

All you need to know about Caveats: A legal notice that can impact your Property ownership

A property is one of the most valuable assets a person can have. However, there are times when a property owner or seller may not have full control over their property. This is where a caveat comes in. A caveat is a legal notice that prevents a property owner from selling or dealing with their property. It can be a significant hindrance to property ownership, especially when it is not properly understood. This article will provide an overview of caveats, including what they are, how they work, and how to deal with them.

 

What is a Caveat?

A caveat is a legal notice that alerts the Registrar that there is another interest in the property. It is not a registered interest, but a statutory injunction. When a caveat is lodged, it prevents certain dealings with the property and gives notice to potential buyers that there is a caveatable interest against it.

What is a Caveatable Interest?
A caveat can only be lodged if the caveator has a caveatable interest, which is a presently existing equitable interest connected to the property that they are entitled to protect. A mortgage or an easement could be a caveatable interest, but a beneficiary’s interest in a discretionary trust is not. A person cannot lodge a caveat just because they have a dispute with the property owner. There must be a caveatable interest to protect.

How to Lodge a Caveat
To lodge a caveat, the required form must be submitted electronically, along with a lodgement fee, to both the Lands Titles Office and the Department of Natural Resources. The caveat must include a full description of the caveatable interest claimed, the property affected, and the caveator’s full name and address. Once a caveat is lodged, it will remain on the property title until it is lapsed, withdrawn, cancelled, or removed by application to the Supreme Court.

How to Deal with a Caveat
If you are the property owner and there is a caveat on your property, it is essential to act quickly. A caveat can impact a property settlement as it prevents any dealings with the property until it is removed. Your conveyancer can perform title searches to reveal any registered interests, including caveats, against the property. Your Real Estate Agent should order a title search prior to creating a contract of sale to ensure correct disclosure.

You can serve a notice on the caveator demanding they start court proceedings to prove the claimed interest. If they do not do so within fourteen days, the caveat will lapse. Alternatively, you can apply to the Supreme Court or Titles Queensland to have the caveat removed. This is usually done by filing a notice of motion, which is a formal application to the court to have the caveat removed.

What Happens if a Caveat is Lodged Without Proper Grounds?
If a caveat is lodged without proper grounds, the caveator may be required to pay compensation to parties who suffer loss or damage as a result. The court may also order the removal of the caveat and may impose a penalty on the caveator.

What to Do if purchasing a property with a Caveat?
Understand the nature of the caveat: Find out what the caveat relates to and the reason why it was lodged on the property. This information can be obtained from the seller or their conveyancer.
Seek legal advice: Consult with a conveyancer or lawyer who has experience with caveats to determine the impact of the caveat on the property and the transaction.
Negotiate with the seller: Depending on the nature of the caveat, you may be able to negotiate with the seller to resolve the issue before proceeding to settlement with the purchase as part of the conveyancing process.
Lodge a counter-caveat: If you believe that the caveat is unjustified or invalid, you may be able to lodge a counter-caveat to protect your interests.
Proceed with caution: If you decide to proceed with the purchase despite the caveat, ensure that you fully understand the risks involved and take steps to protect your interests, such as obtaining title insurance.
It is important to take these steps to ensure that you are fully informed about the property and any potential issues before proceeding with the purchase.

What to Do if selling a property with a Caveat?
Disclose the caveat: You must disclose the caveat to potential buyers before entering into a contract of sale. Failure to do so may result in legal action against you.
Explain the nature of the caveat: Provide potential buyers with an explanation of the nature of the caveat, why it was lodged, and how it may affect the property.
Obtain legal advice: Consult with a conveyancer or lawyer who has experience with caveats to ensure that the caveat is disclosed correctly and to determine how it may affect the sale.
Resolve the issue: If possible, try to resolve the issue that led to the caveat being lodged before selling the property. This may involve negotiating with the person who lodged the caveat or seeking legal advice on how to have it removed.
Adjust the sale price: If the caveat is likely to affect the value of the property or the ability of the buyer to obtain finance with a bank or financial institution, you may need to adjust the sale price to reflect this.
It is important to take these steps to ensure that the sale is conducted fairly and that potential buyers are fully informed about the property and any potential issues.

In QLD who usually lodges caveats over the property?
In Queensland, a caveat can be lodged by any person or organization who has a valid interest in the property. This includes:

Owners who have a registered interest in the property, such as a mortgage or lease.
Unregistered owners, such as a person who has contributed to the purchase price of the property but is not listed on the title.
Creditors who have a debt owed to them that is secured against the property, such as Governing Bodies who are owed for Rates or Land Tax.
Parties to a contract who have an interest in the property, such as a purchaser who has paid a deposit but has not yet settled the transaction.
Anyone who has a claim on the property, such as a spouse who is entitled to a share of the property in a divorce settlement.
In summary, anyone who has a legitimate interest in the property can lodge a caveat in Queensland.

FAQ 
Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about caveats:

Q.Can a caveat be lodged against a property that is not yet registered?

A. No, a caveat cannot be lodged against an unregistered property.

Q. Can a caveat be lodged without the property owner’s knowledge?

A. Yes, a caveat can be lodged without the property owner’s knowledge. However, the property owner must be notified of the caveat within 21 days of its lodgement.

Q. Can a caveat be lodged against a property that is jointly owned?

A. Yes, a caveat can be lodged against a property that is jointly owned. However, it is recommended to obtain the consent of all co-owners before lodging a caveat.

Q. How long does a caveat last?

A caveat lasts for six months from the date of lodgement. It can be renewed for a further six months, but this must be done before the caveat expires.

Q. What happens if a caveat expires?

A. If a caveat expires, it is no longer in effect and cannot prevent the property from being sold or transferred. However, if the person who lodged the caveat still has a claim against the property, they can lodge another caveat.

Q. Can a caveat be removed?

A. Yes, a caveat can be removed if the person who lodged it agrees to its removal, or if the property owner successfully challenges the caveat in court.

Q. What are the consequences of lodging a caveat?

A. Lodging a caveat can prevent the property from being sold or transferred until the caveat is removed or expires. It can also prompt legal action from the property owner, particularly if they believe the caveat was lodged unfairly or without a valid reason.

Q. Should I lodge a caveat?

A. Lodging a caveat should be done with caution, as it can have serious legal consequences. It is recommended to seek legal advice before lodging a caveat to ensure that it is done for valid reasons and will not result in legal action.

Q. Can a caveat be lodged on commericial owned poperty?

A. Yes, a caveat can be lodged on commercial property. A caveat is a legal document that is registered on the title of a property to protect the interests of a person or organization who has a claim on the property. It is commonly used in real estate transactions to prevent the sale or transfer of a property until a certain condition is met or a dispute is resolved. Whether the property is commercial or residential, a caveat can be lodged on it as long as the person or organization lodging the caveat has a valid claim on the property.

Q. Do all conveyancers understand the ins and outs of caveats?

A. Conveyancers are legal professionals who specialize in property transactions, and therefore they should have a good understanding of caveats. However, the level of knowledge and experience that a conveyancer has with caveats may vary depending on their individual expertise and the complexity of the case. It is important to choose a conveyancer who is knowledgeable and experienced in the area of law that your caveat relates to, to ensure that your interests are protected and that the caveat is lodged correctly.

Q. Should a caveat be dislosed before purchasing a contract

A. If a caveat is already registered on a property, it is advisable to disclose this information before enerting into a contract of sale otherwise there could be non-disclosure or misrepresentation claims. This is because the caveat may affect the ability to transfer ownership of the property, or it may indicate that there is a dispute or claim on the property. If the caveat is not disclosed and the purchaser proceeds with the contract, they may later find out that they cannot transfer ownership of the property or that they have inherited a legal dispute or claim. It is therefore in the best interests of both the buyer and the seller to disclose any caveats on the property before entering into a contract.

Q. Do the laws and regulations change from depending on the State or Territory in Australia?

A. Yes, laws and regulations can vary from state to state or territory in Australia. While there are many federal laws that apply across the country, each state and territory has its own legislation and regulations in areas such as property law, family law, and criminal law. This means that the legal requirements and procedures for lodging a caveat, for example, may be different in Queensland compared to New South Wales. It is important to seek advice from a legal professional who is familiar with the laws and regulations in the state or territory where the property is located to ensure that all legal requirements are met.

 

 

In conclusion, caveats are an important legal tool for protecting one’s interests in a real property. They can be lodged to prevent the registration of any dealings on the property and can be a useful way to ensure that your legal rights are protected. It is important to understand the process of lodging a caveat and the legal implications that come with it. Seeking the advice of a legal professional is recommended before lodging a caveat. By doing so, you can ensure that the process is conducted correctly and your interests are protected.

 

This is general advice only, for specific legal advice speak with your expert legal representative or solicitor.

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contracts@sunstateconveyancing.com.au 07 3828 2069
Brisbane